im a baby

five o clock somewhere

sad mother fucker

sad mother fucker

missvoltairine:

likeafieldmouse:

Yarisal & Kublitz - Anger Release Machine (2008) - Vending machine, porcelain, crystal glasses, plates, statuettes, various items

this just makes me anxious because ceramics feels

Reblogged from
garabating:

Newpoleon by Fran Recacha

garabating:

Newpoleon by Fran Recacha

Reblogged from garabating
firsttimeuser:

Shadows are weightless sometimes (unknown author)
the Author must be known?

firsttimeuser:

Shadows are weightless sometimes (unknown author)

the Author must be known?

Reblogged from First Time User
Reblogged from

bobbycaputo:

Fly Geyser 

Fly Geyser, also known as Fly Ranch Geyser is a small geothermal geyser that is located approximately 20 miles (32 km) north of Gerlach in Washoe County, Nevada. The Geyser is located in Hualapai Flat, about 1/3 of a mile from State Route 34. It is large enough to be seen from the road.

Fly Geyser is a little-known tourist attraction, even to Nevada residents. It is located near the edge of Fly Reservoir and is only about 5 feet (1.5 m) high, (12 feet (3.7 m) counting the mound on which it sits). The Geyser is not an entirely natural phenomenon, and was accidentally created in 1916 during well drilling. The well functioned normally for several decades, but in the 1960s geothermally heated water found a weak spot in the wall and began escaping to the surface. Dissolved minerals started rising and accumulating, creating the mount on which the geyser sits, which continues growing. Today water is constantly spewing, reaching 5 feet (1.5 m) in the air. The geyser contains several terraces discharging water into 30 to 40 pools over an area of 30 hectares (74 acres). The geyser is made up of a series of different minerals, which gives it its magnificent coloration.

Reblogged from blogging is overrated
mucholderthen:

A polished meteorite slice viewed at 15 X.
[ meteorite times ]

mucholderthen:

A polished meteorite slice viewed at 15 X.

meteorite times ]

Reblogged from Science Visualized

can you imagine

Reblogged from INNFINITEJEST
beneaththeearthscrust:

Necessary!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

beneaththeearthscrust:

Necessary!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

lucienballard:


One of the maps from the Soil Atlas of Africa, edited by the European commission, 2013. Photograph: European commission.
Africa’s soil diversity mapped for the first time.

The Atlas drawn up by international experts aims to expand understanding of soil and how Africa can manage it sustainably.

A team of international experts has drawn up the Soil Atlas of Africa – the first such book mapping this key natural resource – to help farmers, land managers and policymakers understand the diversity and importance of soil, and the need to manage it through sustainable use.
They say that despite soil’s importance, most people in Africa lack knowledge about it, partly because information tends to be confined to academic publications read only by scientists.
“There was an existing database on soil that had not been updated by soil science experts from Africa, so we asked them to provide us with new information, which we translated into a form understandable to key stakeholders,” said Arwyn Jones, a member of the soil team at the land resource management unit of the European commission’s joint research centre, which produced the atlas.
The project began four years ago, and involved experts from the European commission, the African Union (AU) and the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. The atlas was released at the meeting of the AU and EU commissions in Addis Ababa last month.
Robert Zougmoré, regional programme manager for west Africa at the Cgiar research programme on climate change, agriculture and food security, says the atlas displays the diversity of African soil for both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes.

Download the Soil Atlas of Africa as a pdf.
Via:   The Guardian.
Source: The European Commission Joint Research Centre.

lucienballard:

One of the maps from the Soil Atlas of Africa, edited by the European commission, 2013. Photograph: European commission.

Africa’s soil diversity mapped for the first time.

The Atlas drawn up by international experts aims to expand understanding of soil and how Africa can manage it sustainably.

A team of international experts has drawn up the Soil Atlas of Africa – the first such book mapping this key natural resource – to help farmers, land managers and policymakers understand the diversity and importance of soil, and the need to manage it through sustainable use.

They say that despite soil’s importance, most people in Africa lack knowledge about it, partly because information tends to be confined to academic publications read only by scientists.

“There was an existing database on soil that had not been updated by soil science experts from Africa, so we asked them to provide us with new information, which we translated into a form understandable to key stakeholders,” said Arwyn Jones, a member of the soil team at the land resource management unit of the European commission’s joint research centre, which produced the atlas.

The project began four years ago, and involved experts from the European commission, the African Union (AU) and the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation. The atlas was released at the meeting of the AU and EU commissions in Addis Ababa last month.

Robert Zougmoré, regional programme manager for west Africa at the Cgiar research programme on climate change, agriculture and food security, says the atlas displays the diversity of African soil for both agricultural and non-agricultural purposes.

Download the Soil Atlas of Africa as a pdf.

Via:   The Guardian.

Source: The European Commission Joint Research Centre.

Reblogged from admixtus
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